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Policy Briefs

Access to micro and informal loans: evaluating the impact on the quality of life of poor females in South Africa

Talita Greyling
Since the early 1980s, many governments have investigated the possibility of utilising access to microloans, as a pathway to grow economies out of unemployment and thereby improve people’s quality of life. Studies that have previously investigated the impact of microloans, found a positive...
Apr 2019
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Quality of life: validation of an instrument and analysis of relationships between dimensions

Talita Greyling
Background The conventional approach to measuring quality of life was centred on the use of income measures such as GDP. There has, however, been growing acceptance of the limitations of this approach and of the need for a more multifaceted measure of quality of life. For example, the Report by the...
Apr 2019
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Sanctioned Quotas vs Information Provisioning for Community Wildlife Conservation in Zimbabwe: A Framed Field Experiment Approach

Herbert Ntuli
Local communities in Africa benefit from protected areas through a number of activities such as grazing their livestock and revenues gained from touristic activities. These two activities are not independent because the feeding habits of large herbivores such as elephants prevent bush encroachment...
Apr 2019
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Skill Shortages as a Barrier to Women’s Start Ups: A Model with Evidence from Eswatini

Zuzana Brixiova and Thierry Kangoye
This paper examines gender gaps in entrepreneurship in developing and emerging countries through linking entrepreneurship to skills and productivity. The approach reflects the stylized facts that women in less developed countries are often starting their own businesses with less education, work...
Apr 2019
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The household effects of very large electricity tariff hikes in Zambia

Mashekwa Maboshe, Akabondo Kabechani and Grieve Chelwa
Under-pricing of electricity is prevalent in nearly 70 percent of all sub-Saharan African countries. Consequently, the electricity sectors are financially unviable and unable to maintain or expand the electricity infrastructure, leading to unendurable power deficits and outages in the region. The...
Mar 2019
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Factors influencing people’s perceptions towards conservation of transboundary wildlife resources. The case of the Great-Limpopo Trans-frontier Conservation Area

Herbert Ntuli
The perceptions of indigenous people towards protected areas greatly determine the success of integrated conservation and development projects in most 3rd world countries as their perceptions affect their attitude and behaviour towards conservation. Local communities living adjacent to national...
Mar 2019
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Can local communities afford full control over wildlife conservation? The Case of CAMPFIRE in Zimbabwe

Herbert Ntuli
Zimbabwe’s community-based conservation model, which brings together peasant farmers in a tourism-focused approach to wildlife management, has enjoyed limited success since its inception during the mid-1980s due to a number of reasons. Community involvement in wildlife conservation is one of the...
Mar 2019
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Motivating teachers in rural Zambia using a monetary incentive

Grieve Chelwa, Miquel Pellicer and Mashekwa Maboshe
Like many developing countries, the achievement gap between rural and urban areas in Zambia remains substantial. For example, the share of students scoring well on the Primary School Leaving Examinations (the Grade 7 Examinations) in rural areas is about half what it is in urban areas, according to...
Mar 2019
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Determinants of tax revenue performance in the Southern African Development Community (SADC)

Michael Ade
African countries (including the Southern African Development Community (SADC) countries) have recently considered additional robust means of mobilising tax revenue in order to meet revenue targets and consistently provide for the developmental needs of its citizens. For instance, countries have been considering Domestic Resource Mobilisation (DRM) initiatives (as opposed to External Resource Mobilisation - ERM), via improved management of taxation and reduction of tax leakages, in line with the general agenda of enhanced fiscal policy coordination (African Economic Outlook (AEO) 2013). The argument is that DRM would lead to Africa achieving greater economic development, independence and better mobilisation of revenue. Enhanced mobilisation of revenue entails expanding the tax base in these countries by capturing in the tax net, activities not adequately taxed because of policy or administrative weaknesses. Efficient means of taxation could help improve the governments’ revenue positions, reduce public sector borrowing requirement (PSBR), reduce dependency on aid and increase countries’ ownership of their development agenda (including the UN’s post-2015 development agenda or the Sustainable Development Goals - SDGs).
Feb 2019
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